icloud password

Tips for your Apple ID password

If you use any Apple devices, you have an Apple ID. And that Apple ID is crucial since that’s how Apple tracks what you’ve purchased, downloaded, and particularly if you’re using any of the iCloud services whatsoever. And while it’s always been important to create and use a strong password for your Apple ID, I feel that it’s even more important now than ever, given how many important hacks have been occurring the last few years. So, make sure to use 2 Factor Authentication, and then make sure you’re using a really strong password.

Also, I see more people using the Notes app on their Mac and iPhones to store sensitive information, such as all their passwords and financial information. So, it seems to me that Apple ID and iCloud login info will become an increasingly appealing target for hackers in the coming years.
I work with clients every week, and even though I try very hard not to let people share their login info with me, they will often blurt it out right in front of me, or write it down so that I can see it. And what I can say, is that most people are using awful passwords.

Apple’s guidelines is that your password must contain at least eight characters, a number, an uppercase letter, and a lowercase letter.
So, here’s my recommendations for this password:

  1. Don’t make it unnecessarily long. I’ve seen people use passwords that are 25 or 30 characters long, and that’s going to be a major pain in the ass when you have to enter that whenever you download a new app. Keep it short. Use just 8 characters, just like Apple wants you too. Try not to go over that.
  2. Use a password that you are not using anywhere else. You should do this for most important passwords anyways, but it’s particularly important with this password.
  3. Use something that makes no sense whatsoever. I see people use their dog’s name and birth-date all the time. Or their kids name. These are things that can often be found online if someone is trying to guess at your password. Social engineering is one of the key tools that hackers use, so don’t use anything that someone could find out online with a little bit of effort.

So, my recommendation is avoid at all cost using something like this: Julie1992 – It might be easy for you to remember, but you’re probably using names and dates that mean something to you, and chances are that you used something similar on other websites as well.
Use something like this instead: bur83-Lk – That makes absolutely no sense, and it should be very unique. And it’s really not that hard to memorize if you give it a try.

So, that’s it in a nutshell… I strongly recommend using a nonsensical password that’s short enough for you to memorize and type with ease. Hopefully, a strong password will help save you from any security breaches in the future.

Posted by Ian Van Slyke

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