Mac Security

New security updates

New security updates

Today Apple released the iOS 11.3.1 update, and the macOS 10.13.4 update. The iOS update includes a fix for a display bug that some users experienced with 3rd party replacement screens.

Both of the these are mainly security updates, and just be aware that the macOS update is fairly large and requires a lengthy restart. The download itself is around 1 Gigabyte and it took about 45 minutes for my MacBook Pro to restart after starting the update. So, make sure you will not need your Mac for a while before you do this update.

Posted by Ian Van Slyke in Apple news, iOS, iPad, iPhone, Mac Security, 0 comments
New Apple updates

New Apple updates

This week, Apple has released updates across multiple devices. The iOS 11.2.6 update fixes some issues on iPhones and iPads. While on other devices, be sure to download macOS 10.13.3 supplemental update, watchOS 4.2.3, and tvOS 11.2.6.

These updates fix security issues and various other bugs which could hamper your devices. Better safe than sorry !

Posted by Ian Van Slyke in Apple news, iPhone, Mac, Mac Security, 0 comments
Apple released macOS High Sierra 10.13.1 and iOS 11.1 today

Apple released macOS High Sierra 10.13.1 and iOS 11.1 today

Today, Apple released two important updates for Mac and iPhone/iPad users. These are the first substantial updates for these two operating systems which came out last month. They introduce very little in the way of new features apart from 70 new emojis. These are mainly security and stability improvements which should be much welcomed for anyone who upgraded to these operating systems. You can download and install these updates from their respective App Store.

Posted by Ian Van Slyke in Apple news, iOS, iPhone, Mac, Mac Security, 0 comments
Tips for your Apple ID password

Tips for your Apple ID password

If you use any Apple devices, you have an Apple ID. And that Apple ID is crucial since that’s how Apple tracks what you’ve purchased, downloaded, and particularly if you’re using any of the iCloud services whatsoever. And while it’s always been important to create and use a strong password for your Apple ID, I feel that it’s even more important now than ever, given how many important hacks have been occurring the last few years. So, make sure to use 2 Factor Authentication, and then make sure you’re using a really strong password.

Also, I see more people using the Notes app on their Mac and iPhones to store sensitive information, such as all their passwords and financial information. So, it seems to me that Apple ID and iCloud login info will become an increasingly appealing target for hackers in the coming years.
I work with clients every week, and even though I try very hard not to let people share their login info with me, they will often blurt it out right in front of me, or write it down so that I can see it. And what I can say, is that most people are using awful passwords.

Apple’s guidelines is that your password must contain at least eight characters, a number, an uppercase letter, and a lowercase letter.
So, here’s my recommendations for this password:

  1. Don’t make it unnecessarily long. I’ve seen people use passwords that are 25 or 30 characters long, and that’s going to be a major pain in the ass when you have to enter that whenever you download a new app. Keep it short. Use just 8 characters, just like Apple wants you too. Try not to go over that.
  2. Use a password that you are not using anywhere else. You should do this for most important passwords anyways, but it’s particularly important with this password.
  3. Use something that makes no sense whatsoever. I see people use their dog’s name and birth-date all the time. Or their kids name. These are things that can often be found online if someone is trying to guess at your password. Social engineering is one of the key tools that hackers use, so don’t use anything that someone could find out online with a little bit of effort.

So, my recommendation is avoid at all cost using something like this: Julie1992 – It might be easy for you to remember, but you’re probably using names and dates that mean something to you, and chances are that you used something similar on other websites as well.
Use something like this instead: bur83-Lk – That makes absolutely no sense, and it should be very unique. And it’s really not that hard to memorize if you give it a try.

So, that’s it in a nutshell… I strongly recommend using a nonsensical password that’s short enough for you to memorize and type with ease. Hopefully, a strong password will help save you from any security breaches in the future.

Posted by Ian Van Slyke in iPhone, Mac, Mac Security, Recommendations, Tips & Tricks, 0 comments
New Apple updates

New Apple updates

This week, Apple released updates for a lot of their products, including the Mac, iPhone & iPad, the Apple watch, and Apple TV. These are mainly bug fixes and security improvements, with no real new features. But any security improvements are pretty important these days, and I would highly recommend that you do the iOS 10.3.3  update in particular, as it resolves an important Wi-Fi security issue. Overall, if you own any of these products, you should update since you’re only going to get stability improvements with no downsides.

Posted by Ian Van Slyke in Apple news, iOS, iPhone, Mac, Mac Security, 0 comments
Avoiding malware on Mac

Avoiding malware on Mac

Over the last few years of working with clients, I’ve seen a huge spike in people picking up malware/adware on their Mac. Malware is a pretty broad term which encompasses all sorts of malicious software, but the kind you’re most likely to get on your Mac is usually adware. Once on your computer it will embed itself in your web browsers and might start re-directing your web traffic, change your homepage, and probably show you all sorts of unwanted ads, warning messages and pop-ups. Malware on the Mac is not particularly harmful, but can be very annoying, and seriously limit what you can do on the web. That being said, it’s usually fairly easy to remove.

But ideally, you want to avoid picking up malware in the first place by taking some basic precautions. One of the most common ways that people pick up malware on their computer is by mistakenly downloading fake Adobe Flash updates. You’ll see some sort of pop-up that tells you need to install a newer version of Flash, but when you click on it you end up unknowingly installing malware instead. Here’s how you should install Flash updates the safe way :
Go to your System Preferences and click on the Flash Player at the bottom left of the window.

macOS system preferences

Once there, look for the Updates tab and run a check to see whether you do need updates. And if so, do it from here. This is one of the best ways you can avoid malware.

The other big precaution you can take is by not downloading movies, music, software and games from illegal sharing sites. Unfortunately, even though it may be tempting, those sites are filled with offers for free stuff that often turn out to be infected with malware. So, you just need to use good judgement there.

And finally, my other big recommendation is to stay  away from anything called MacKeeper, MacDefender, or MacSecurity at all costs. These programs are actually malware themselves, and try to fool people into downloading the software and then make the problem you’re trying to fix even worse. If you’ve ever downloaded any of these, remove them from your Mac using MalwareBytes for Mac. This is an excellent piece of software that removes malware from your Mac, and it’s free.

So, there you go, hopefully this helps to keep your Mac safe out there 🤓

Posted by Ian Van Slyke in Mac, Mac Security, Recommendations, Tips & Tricks, 0 comments